703-528-3336
1-855-VA-SMILE
1515 Wilson Blvd., Suite 103
Arlington, VA 22209

"A first class practice from top to bottom!" — Bob B.

Monthly Archives: August 2014

9 Dental-Related Fun Facts

INDEED… DENTISTRY IS SERIOUS business. But that doesn’t mean we have to take ourselves TOO seriously all the time, right?

9 Dental-Related Fun Facts

  1. A typical elephant’s molar weighs nearly nine pounds.
  2. In 1994, a West Virginia prison inmate braided dental floss into a rope to escape!
  3. The first toothbrush with animal hair bristles was made in China in 1498.
  4. A snail’s mouth is no larger than the head of a pin, but can have 25,000 teeth inside!
  5. Some of the world’s most choked on objects are toothpicks! Be cautious when picking your teeth or holding one in your mouth.
  6. Like cows, humans actually chew side to side—not just up and down.
  7. In North America, over 3 million miles of dental floss are purchased each year… Enough to circle Earth 120 times!
  8. When you skip flossing, you’re missing 35% of your teeth’s surface area!
  9. The first modern(ish) braces were constructed in France in 1728. They were made from metal and string.

Some Interesting Animal Teeth Trivia

Thanks for trusting us to keep your mouth and teeth healthy!

We know it’s a big responsibility and we take it very seriously. Any time you have questions about your oral health, let’s visit.

4 Helpful Tips For Tooth Sensitivity

A SIP OF COFFEE, A SPOONFUL OF ICE CREAM… you never thought that these simple pleasures could cause pain! But when you have sensitive teeth, your favorite foods and beverages can turn against you. Even sour foods and cold weather can drive you crazy!

Sensitive teeth are a common problem. Here are four great tips for easing the discomfort:

#1: Check Your Brushing Technique

Sometimes the problem is that you’re actually TOO enthusiastic with your routine care. If you’re brushing too much or too hard, it can contribute to receding gums. When gums recede, sensitive areas of your teeth are exposed. Always brush with a soft-bristled toothbrush. Brush gently in a circular motion without sawing back-and-forth.

#2: Minimize Acidic Foods & Drinks

One major culprit in an over-acidic diet is soft drinks—but sports/energy drinks, fruit juices, and sour candies can also contribute. Acid erodes your tooth enamel.

Detailed Info About The Causes Of Tooth Sensitivity

#3: Consider Changing Your Toothpaste

Do you use a whitening toothpaste? Check the usage instructions. Whitening toothpastes can be more abrasive which can contribute to sensitivity. If your teeth are hurting, try a toothpaste specially formulated for sensitive teeth instead.

#4: Come Visit With Us!

If you’re experiencing continued sensitivity, we should take a look. Receding gums can be a sign of gum disease. Sensitivity could also indicate a cavity, or be a warning that you’re grinding your teeth at night. To be sure it’s not a serious problem it may be necessary for us to take a look.

Thanks for your trust in our practice. We appreciate you!

If you have questions about tooth sensitivity, please ask below! We love to hear from you. Or message us directly on our Facebook page.

 

5 Simple Steps To Harnessing The Power Of Your Smile

YOUR SMILE IS AMONG YOUR MOST influential assets! But, that doesn’t mean your smile has to be a perfect, “movie star” smile for you to harness its power.

Step 1: Practice, Practice, Practice

Life’s too short to skip the simple things that make you happy. Smile more. Smile and laugh, proudly. Abundantly. Invite people to share in the things that make you smile. Your smiles will foster gratitude. Smiling can become a habit. Seek the opportunity.

Step 2: Be Aware Of The Smile/Emotion Connection

Author and poet, Thích Nhất Hạnh once said, “Sometimes your joy is the source of your smile, but sometimes your smile can be the source of your joy.” We often only think about the way positive emotions trigger smiles, but it works the other way too. Smiles trigger positive emotions. They can even help us better deal with stress or pain.
 

Step 3: Eliminate The “Courtesy” Smile

Make a conscious decision to replace every half-hearted smile given in politeness with a genuine smile. You can do it!

Step 4: Remember How Attractive Your Smile Makes You

A recent study of 5,000+ singles found that both men (58%) and women (71%) judge the opposite sex MOST (and FIRST) on the appearance of their teeth. Smiles invite and strengthen relationships.

Step 5: Keep Your Smile Healthy

Treat your smile with the love it deserves. Brush and floss daily, and schedule regular checkups.

We Love Your Smiles

Some estimates say that 30% of the general population is unhappy with their smiles to a point where they avoid smiling. That’s sad. If you feel that way, let’s visit. Sometimes it just helps to talk about it. Whether you’re ready for a big change or just a tiny, subtle improvement, we can help you harness the power of YOUR smile. Thanks for being our valued patients and friends.

4 Ways To Avoid Cracking A Tooth

THE HEALTHY ENAMEL THAT COVERS YOUR TEETH is the hardest substance in your body… It’s even harder than your bones! That’s great news when you consider the amount of pressure our jaw muscles exert on our teeth.

However, your teeth can still be cracked and chipped. Here are four “don’ts” for avoiding a cracked tooth.

#1: Don’t Chew On Ice

High powered blenders have special blades and settings for crushing ice. So imagine what chewing on ice can do to your teeth! Some people do it out of habit—and others do it when they’re nervous or bored. Just stop! It can chip or crack teeth.

#2: Don’t Chew Hard Sweets

Hard candy isn’t good for your oral health anyway. Besides the high sugar content, and the long periods of time the sugar sits on your teeth, hard candy can also crack your teeth. Jawbreakers, suckers, and frozen candy bars are common culprits. If you enjoy these occasionally, consider licking them instead to avoid damage.

#3: Don’t Bite Down On Unpopped Popcorn Kernels

We know that they’re difficult to avoid! When you’re enthralled in a movie, the last thing on your mind is the popcorn you’re enjoying. Just try to be aware of those pesky unpopped kernels!

#4: Don’t Use Teeth As Tools

They’re not bottle openers. They’re not scissors. They’re not pliers. You get the idea.

Contact Us Immediately If You Crack A Tooth

Together, we’ll figure out the best course of action.

Thanks for the trust you place in us. We appreciate having you as our valued patient!

We Use Social Media To Better Serve You

THERE ARE A LOT OF REASONS why businesses participate in social media. First and foremost, we’re using social media to better serve you—our valued patients and friends. But unlike many businesses, our social media efforts to serve you don’t start online—they start in our practice.

Whether Online Or In Our Office…

1.) We’re listening. We want to be part of the conversation. We want to make it easy for you to connect with us. Open, honest communication with our patients both online and in person builds trust—and, we’ll never take that trust for granted.

2.) We’re doing what we can to make your visits (and life) better. As your lifelong oral health partner, our goal is to provide information that’s relevant and useful in benefitting your comfort, health, and appearance.

3.) We’re connected to YOU—not your teeth. Although your smile is our focus, we care about you. As a part of our “family”, you’re so much more than a checkup or procedure.

BTW, Do You Use Instagram?

Wow. Instagram is exploding! Are you using it? We were amazed by the thousands of photos that an Instagram search for #Dentist produced! And, it was pretty funny seeing the photos people are posting!

Next time you come in, if you’re on Instagram, pull out your smartphone and let’s take a photo together. It’ll be fun!

Social Media Bridges The Gaps

Sometimes we only see you every six months. Social media allows us to “see” (and connect with) you regularly.

Social media is also another open door to our team. If you know anyone who would benefit from connecting with us, please share this post with them or send them to our Facebook page. Our very best new patients typically come from referrals. Thanks.

We’re grateful to have friends and patients like you.

Our Tribute To Some Of The First Women In Dentistry

TODAY THERE ARE AS MANY WOMEN AS THERE ARE MEN in dental schools. But 150 years ago it was very different. We admire and honor those women who paved the way.

Unofficially, Women In Dentistry Go Back A Long Way

Although a dental education wasn’t available to women until fairly recently, women have been practicing dentistry for a long time. This ranged from neighborhood women using traditional remedies, to women like Emeline Roberts Jones and Amalia Assur.

Amalia Assur learned dentistry in her family’s business… Her father was a dentist, and so was her brother. In Sweden, the Royal Board of Health granted her special permission to independently practice dentistry in 1852.

Around the same time in America, Emeline Roberts Jones was married to a dentist and served as his assistant for years. When her husband died in 1864, Emeline continued serving their patients. Later, she was awarded an honorary membership into the Connecticut Dental Society.

Lucy Hobbes Taylor Was The First Woman To Receive A Dentistry Degree

Lucy Hobbes Taylor earned her dental degree in 1866, but her road there was long and hard. She was initially denied entrance to medical school based on gender. Looking for a warmer welcome into dentistry, she started studying under the dean at the Ohio College of Dental Surgery. She applied for the college in 1861 and was denied.

Lucy persisted in apprenticing under several prestigious dentists, then boldly opened her own practice. After successfully treating patients for years and being admitted to the Iowa State Dental Society, she was finally accepted to the Ohio College of Dental Surgery in November, 1865. Because of her experience, she was only required to take one course before she was awarded her D.D.S. in 1866.

A Short Video Tribute From The University of Michigan School of Dentistry

Many Others Made A Difference

Other women struggled through societal restrictions, bureaucracy, and disadvantage to contribute to the field of dentistry. These include Ida Gray Nelson Rollins, the first African American dentist, and Grace Rogers Spalding, who co-founded the American Academy of Periodontology and helped spearhead the preventative dentistry and gum care movement.

Thanks for your trust in our dental practice!

We appreciate having you as our valued patient. If you have comments about these great women, we’d love to hear them in the comments section below. And, you can always reach out to us on our Facebook page!

Lucy Beaman Hobbs Taylor photo courtesy of the Kansas Historical Society
Emeline Roberts Jones photo courtesy of The New Haven Museum & Historical Society

The Connection Between Gum Disease And Dementia

NEARLY ALL OF US EXPERIENCE bleeding gums at some point in our lives. But don’t assume it’s no big deal. Gum disease can have serious consequences including pain, chronic bleeding and tooth loss. It has also been linked to a number of total body health conditions including Alzheimer’s.

Skipping The Floss Can Increase Dementia Risk

A recent study of over 5000 retirement community members found that NOT brushing daily could increase the risk of developing dementia up to 65%. Other research supports the correlation between tooth loss and Alzheimer’s. Some researchers theorize that because tooth loss and sensitivity may contribute to poor eating habits, that also affects brain health. And, Alzheimer’s patients are more likely to neglect their personal dental care. However, even with these other variables removed, there seems to be a strong link.

Miles Of Floss

How Oral Bacteria Hurts Your Brain

When you experience gum irritation and bleeding you essentially have an open wound and bacteria from your mouth can enter the rest of the body through your bloodstream. In one British study, traces of P. gingivalis were found in brain tissue of those afflicted with Alzheimer’s. It may be that the bacteria creates brain inflammation, causing dementia. It could also be that it triggers an immune response which attacks healthy brain cells.

Take Care Of Your Body By Taking Care Of Your Gums

Taking care of your gum health is an important part of overall health. Follow these steps for a healthy mouth and a healthy brain:

  1. Brush every day.
  2. Floss every day.
  3. Don’t postpone your regular cleanings.

Do you have someone you care about who could benefit from this information? Share the message and remind them to floss!

Thanks for your trust in our practice. We appreciate you!

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